Author Topic: Always on Sunday (1965)  (Read 2292 times)

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Offline BoyScoutKevin

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Re: Always on Sunday (1965)
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2016, 08:45:25 PM »
Concluding with part III of Always on Sunday.

15. Bribe me with art
I think this is the 1st time I have ever heard of a painting or paintings being used as an attempted bribe.

16. Surprise me!
Surprised that his paintings did not begin to sell immediately after his trial.

17. Publicity
As the only bad publicity is no publicity, and being found guilty, after a public trial, even if the punishment was not as severe as it could have been, is certainly bad publicity.

18. Nudity
You can hardly get any type of film from Ken Russell without him putting a nude woman in it.

19. Picasso
Pablo Picasso. That is a painter who Ken should have done a program on for the BBC.

20. Sympathy
Whether they deserved it or not, Ken could almost always get his audience to feel some sympathy for his subject.

21. The fool
It is said that a person who has himself for a lawyer has a fool for a client. It is too bad that Rousseau did not take that advice, when it came to being his own doctor.

22. The end
His The Dream had a value of o'er $1,000,000 in 1965. Just think how much it'd be worth now, o'er 50 years later.

Next time: an attempt to do something a little different. If I can find it on the internet, a critique of the script for Dracula. The film he wanted to do in lieu of the film he did do, which was Lair of the White Worm.


Offline BoyScoutKevin

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Re: Always on Sunday (1965)
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2016, 08:40:14 PM »
Continuing with part II of Always on Sunday

08. Genius
Like a lot of geniuses, he was a man ahead of his time.

09. Sleeping Gypsy
Probably his most well known painting.

10. Original price
1800 to 2000 French francs. Imagine how much that painting would be worth today. You just want to kick someone for not buying it, when it was 1st offered for sale.

11. Marriage.
 Unlike a lot of marriages portrayed in Ken's films, the one portrayed here seems to be one of the few happy ones.

12. Tragedy
But one touched by tragedy, as she would die of cancer 4 years later.

13. 1899
An early form of crock pot?

14. Lair of the White Worm
We had fake bagpipe and harmonica playing in Lair of the White Worm. Here we have fake clarinet and trombone, fake cello and trumpet playing, or enough for a fake sextet.

Next time: part III and conclusion of Always on Sunday



Offline BoyScoutKevin

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Always on Sunday (1965)
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2016, 10:29:13 PM »
01. A dramatized portrait of the painter Henri Rousseau (1844-1910) as portrayed by James Lloyd, narrated by Oliver Reed, and directed by Ken Russell.

02. One of the some 24 episodes, and the last, that Ken made for the BBC TV series Monitor between 1959 and 1965.

03. Though, I don't remember who, it seems to me that Rousseau was not the only French painter who worked for the French government before turning to painting.

04. Like most of the French painters, whose paintings are shown, he had a most distinctive style.

05. And another of Ken's controversial artists, who Ken seemed to favor in his documentaries.

06. A painter ahead of his time. At least ahead of critical and public opinion.

07. Oh, to have purchased one of his unsold paintings in his early career. How much it'd be worth now?

Next time: part II of Always on Sunday