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I always find these lists interesting. As for how many I have seen, the answer is 0. And I am including, unfortunately, Song of Summer. Though, thinking about it, why is Tommy not on this list?
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Savage Messiah: Ken Russell / The 30 best films about music, chosen by musicians
« Last post by Iain Fisher on August 18, 2019, 03:14:35 PM »
The Observer newspaper got musicians to choose their favourite films about music.

Song of Summer (a tv programme not a film, but as it's Ken we can let it pass.  It was chosen by Neil Tennant of The Pet Shop Boys.  He describes it as “an elegiac film about the painful process of creating music and the end of a creative life. It’s very emotional, unsettling and moving. Delius is an incredibly tragic figure, both fragile and brutal. Russell was brilliant at creating images to accompany music.”

The list is mainly pop/rock music plus the odd county/ blues/ classical films included.  There are films based on people (The Doors by Oliver Stone, Out of Control (on Joy Division), Walk the Line (Jonny Cash), Bird (Charlie Parker), The Young Ones (Cliff Richard).  Documentaries included Amy (Amy Whitehouse), Cracked Actor (Bowie), 30th Century Man (Scott Walker), C*cksucker Blues (with a title like that it has to be The Rolling Stones), Woodstock, The Kids are Alright (The Who), Live at Pompei (Pink Floyd)..  Others include Cabaret and the magnificent This is Spinal Tap.

The article is here
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/aug/18/the-best-films-about-music-chosen-by-musicians-documentaries-concert-films-biopics
The interviews were carried out by Jude Rogers and Killian Fox.
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"When Ken asked me to play Franz Liszt in this next film Lisztomania, I though he was kidding".

"The script was only 57 pages long- the rest of it was deep inside Ken's terrifying head- and the dialogue was dreadful.  I could see what Ken wanted visually but I felt like I let him down.  Knowing what I know now, I would have changed every single word of it and made the character work".

What it is commendable that Daltrey takes the blame, the fault really lies (IMHO) with whoever decided to start the film without a finished script. That is really one of the cardinal rules of filmmaking: "Never start shooting a film without a finished script in hand."
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Savage Messiah: Ken Russell / Re: The Mystery of Dr Martinu
« Last post by BoyScoutKevin on June 11, 2019, 10:47:57 PM »
Typical. Very typical.
--a little known composer
--humor
--anti-Nazi attitude

Interesting. Very interesting.
--the colors of the Czechoslovakian flag is the same as the American flag: red, white, and blue.
--his attitude toward Americans. One of the few times he depicts Americans in one of his films. And his attitude is not positive.
--his treatment of women.
--an anachronism that is not an anachronism
----table football was invented in 1921, so it is quite possible that it existed at the time this film occurs..

Concluded
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"When Ken asked me to play Franz Liszt in this next film Lisztomania, I though he was kidding".

"The script was only 57 pages long- the rest of it was deep inside Ken's terrifying head- and the dialogue was dreadful.  I could see what Ken wanted visually but I felt like I let him down.  Knowing what I know now, I would have changed every single word of it and made the character work".
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The See Me Feel Me sequence were filmed in Kewwick in the Lake District.

Keith Moon and Oliver Reed became good (drinking) friends.  They had a bet to see who could drink the most brandy- "Ollie passed out where he was sitting.  Keith looked at him, 'You're no fun at all'".
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Daltry talks of the Tommy film happening, then not, then happening, then not.  "And then, all of a sudden, Ken Russell arrived, things started happening very quickly, and I was cast as Tommy".

Just a reminder Ken's influence "Anybody who was in touch with anything in the 1070s was a Ken Russell fan.  He was an icon, a hero, and we idolised him".

Daltry says Ken thought Tommy was the best modern opera since Berg's Wozzeck.

The filming involved 50 or 60 people together for four months, staying in a motel in Hayling Island near Portsmouth- "the intensity of life on a Ken Russell set meant we all developed a close bond quickly".

Daltry had to learn how to act deaf, dumb and blind.  Admirably he talked to disabled extras.

On the Acid Queen scene "Ken tried to work out which tropical creatures I should share a sarcophagus with... First, Ken tried snakes... then he tried butterflies "they were not normal butterflies.  They were giants: plate-sized with bodies the size of a fist".  Ken didn't use any of the footage, he went with poppies.

Some good insights- "Everybody loved Ken.  He was always open to ideas.  If he got stuck on how to shoot a thing he'd always ask, well, what do you think?  And if he liked it, he'd try it."
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Well, the first mention of Ken was on page 5, but the next one is on page 230.

Daltry gives a pleasant but superficial overview of the growth of The Who.  What is particularly interesting is that although they had hit singles and albums, and sell-out world yours, they were in debt- "we'd done all that touring, we'd done Who's Next and Live at Leeds.  We'd made loads of money.  And [our accountant] was pleased to tell us that we were only £600,000 in debt".

Part of the losses were because of damage caused by Keith Moon to hotel rooms.  Daltry underestimates the damages he made "The whole thing was ridiculous.  It was only a wall, a window and a couple of bits of furniture".

Daltry does bring out the downfall of Keith Moon, his addiction to drink, and at the end his loss of his drumming ability.
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I just got Roger Daltrey's autobiography from the library.  I like the Who, and saw them last year (they weren't very good) but of course I am reading to find out what he says about Ken, particularly working with him on Tommy and Lisztomania.  I have just read the first few pages (I'll provide updates as I progress) but Ken is already mentioned on page 5:
     "'One more time, Roger.'  That was one of Ken Russell's favourite catchphrases.  He always liked to take his actors over the edge."
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Beckett, Bond, Pinter discussion / Pinter's house for sale
« Last post by Iain Fisher on May 08, 2019, 06:02:31 PM »
The house Pinter lived in when he wrote The Birthday Party, and No Man’s Land is for sale.  It is a vast mansion but has been refurbished so the photos are not of what the house would have been like when Pinter was there

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7001761/Mansion-belonged-Harold-Pinter-sale-17M.html
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